Family Mediation Geneva (Rive Droite)

EN  FR

How?

A mediation session (by appointment only) normally lasts 1h30. The first session serves to identify the points of conflict and to determine the timeframe as well as the fee. At the end of the first session, clients and mediator sign a Mediation Consent, binding them to confidentiality.

 

In Geneva, mediation is always a voluntary process but judges and the Child Protection Service often advise parties to go see a mediator. It is important that the mediator is trusted by both sides as an independent counsel. Sometimes the mediator meets clients individually in order to prepare the next joint session.

Mediation takes place "in the shadow of the law": legal provisions play a role as a benchmark in a mediation process. However, within the limits set by the law, parties decide themselves what they consider a fair and equitable solution.

 

In case of separation, divorce or parenting rights of unmarried couples there is no formal requirement for representation before the competent Swiss Court (Tribunal de Première Instance; Tribunal de protection de l'adulte et de l'enfant). Hence the necessary documents can be prepared as part of the mediation process and the Mediation Agreement can be sent directly to the Court for ratification.

According to the Geneva Law on Civil Mediation, a mediator «shall exercise his functions in complete independence, neutrality and impartiality.» The authorities do not have access to mediation case files and a mediator cannot be heard as a witness.

 

Languages spoken : English, français, italiano, Nederlands and Deutsch.

 

Fee : pro rata, between CHF 150-300/hour. Mediation is covered by the Assistance Juridique of the Canton of Geneva. The Tribunal de protection de l'adulte et de l'enfant can offer to pay for the first three sessions if it proposes the mediation.

Who?

Ida Koppen works as an expert in mediation, negotiation and facilitation since 1989. She's a registered mediator in the Canton of Geneva (www.ge.ch/mediateurs-assermentes) accredited by the Swiss Associations of Mediators (ASMF/FSM) (www.familienmediation.ch, www.swiss-mediators.org).

 

She works as familiy mediator at the Office Protestant de Consultations Conjugales et Familiales (OPCCF - www.opccf.ch) and is a member of the Board of the Swiss Association for Family Mediation (ASMF – www.familienmediation.ch). She participates in the Swiss Network of Mediators for International Child Abduction Cases.

With a broad multicultural personal background, and extensive knowledge of different legal systems, Ida is well placed to work with international couples and families, to help them understand their specific difficulties and identify the inherent challenges and opportunities.

 

Ida Koppen

As a Fulbright Scholar, Ida specialized in mediation and negotiation at the MIT-Harvard Law School Program on Negotiation. She worked as a researcher and as research coordinator at the Robert Schuman Centre at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. She graduated in law (University of Amsterdam) and in environmental sciences (University of Oregon, Honors College).

 

She received her training in family mediation from Groupement Pro Médiation in Switzerland (www.conflits.ch), recognized by the European Forum of Family Mediation (www.forumeuropeen.eu).

As a professional trainer, Ida is affiliated with the Consensus Building Institute in Cambridge (MA) (CBI - www.cbi.org) and with the Institut d'Etudes du Couple et de la Famille in Geneva (IECF - ww.iecf.ch).

She's President of the Geneva based research-in-action observatory Avenir Familles (www.avenirfamilles.ch).